The Tumultuous Life & Times of Sue the T-Rex

I stopped by Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History last week to get a final look at Sue the Tyrannosaurus Rex before the fossil is dismantled (see the previous story HERE) next month. Looking over the signage, I thought this might be a good opportunity to share some interesting tidbits with photos to help illuminate the difficult life of a T-Rex. So here are some interesting facts about Sue…

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In Steppe with Eofauna’s New Mammoth!

Considering my love for modern-day elephants, it’s a wonder I didn’t name this site “Dave’s Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Pachyderms.” The distant relatives of today’s elephants were both impressive and prolific, spanning every continent but Australia and Antarctica. Today we’ll be traveling back to the mid-Pleistocene to what was once Eurasia and focus on Mammuthus trogontherii a.k.a. the Steppe Mammoth. Larger than other mammoth species, we can all give a big “Thanks” to a scientific research company called Eofauna, allowing us model collectors a chance to put one on our own shelves. This is a European company and I ordered mine courtesy of the US-based Dan’s Dinosaurs. Be sure to pay him a visit!

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A+ Uintatherium Model Flunks Anger Management!

Dinosaurs weren’t the only amazing beasts to have roamed North America. Take Uintatherium for example. This unusual looking mammal, reminiscent of a rhinoceros with its multiple knobby horns, lived about forty to forty-five million years ago in what is now Wyoming. In fact, Uintatherium means “Beast of the Uinta Mountains” where it was discovered. It was an impressive thirteen feet long and weighed in at around 4,000 pounds. In keeping with their proud assortment of amazing prehistoric animals, CollectA added one of these to their menagerie earlier this year.

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A Big “Tanks” for Safari Ltd.’s 2018 Ankylosaurus!

One look at Ankylosaurus and you can easily see why paleontologists often refer to it as a “living tank.” Plates of bone give the armored beast a defensive edge and, if that wasn’t enough, there’s always their signature clubbed tail. This dinosaur was discovered in North America back in 1908, though fossils from its family, Ankylosauridae, have been found in every continent except Africa. Safari Ltd. has added this dinosaur to their list of new 2018 prehistoric animals and it now has the distinction of being my first. In terms of Ankylosaurus representation, I couldn’t ask for a better one to put on the shelf.

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Welcoming Safari Ltd.’s 2018 Triceratops!

Coinciding with the release of their new Regaliceratops, Safari Ltd. is releasing a brand new version of the world’s most popular ceratopsian of all, Triceratops. The beast was first discovered back in 1889 and has the distinction of sporting the largest head of any known land animal; at about a third of its length. Triceratops is without question a North American classic and no stranger to the Silver Screen. In fact, I noticed one running in the trailer for the upcoming Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. It’s a good bet that every dinosaur model collector reading this already has a replica of this animal in their collection which begs the question whether this one warrants you adding another. To this question, I would give a resounding. YES.

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A Royal Welcome to Safari Ltd.’s 2018 Regaliceratops!

If you love ceratopsian dinosaurs as much as I do, there’s no better time to be alive. With forty recognized species since Triceratops back in 1889, half were discovered since the year 2000. Considering the diversity of their signature horns and frills, it’s no wonder toy companies have been working hard to keep up and get their likeness on store shelves. Enter Safari Ltd.’s 2018 Regaliceratops; a nice follow up from last year’s Einiosaurus  and hopefully a signal that the company plans to make new ceratopsian models an annual tradition. But before we take a look, let’s discuss its dino-inspiration…

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Tyrannosaurus Rex Sue is Movin’ on Up!

Call me biased, but I think Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History is one of the best of its kind. I live and grew up just twenty-five minutes south of the city’s Museum Campus which, in addition to Field, includes the John G. Shedd Aquarium and Adler Planetarium. Between recreational family visits and school field trips these institutions would be a staple of my youth with the Field Museum my favorite. As a child, I was guaranteed to see dinosaurs and maybe even bring one home courtesy of their twenty-five cent Mold-a-Rama machines. By the time Sue entered the scene, I was twenty-nine years old and married with kids of my own. I remember the entire city abuzz with news of the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton ever discovered moving in. “Her” arrival was accompanied by a huge media blitz and I recall driving to work one morning and hearing a local DJ parody the old hit, “Runaround Sue,” about it.

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