CollectA’s Elasmotherium is one Mammoth Rhino!

It’s been a while since my last model spotlight which featured Safari Ltd’s beautiful Woolly Rhinoceros. Now I’m back to review one of its equal furry cousins, Elasmotherium – a hulking behemoth the size of a mammoth! In celebration of this immense beast, CollectA has unleashed an equally impressive model and I honestly had no idea how big this sucker was until I saw it with my own eyes! So let’s dive in…

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Safari Ltd. vs CollectA: Mammoth Mash-Up!

As promised, I’m going to pit the CollectA Woolly Mammoth I reviewed recently up against Carnegie Safari Ltd.’s from years back. I’ve owned the latter since its release – well before I starting collecting. It used to sit on my home computer and merged two of my loves; elephants and prehistoric animals. There have been other woolly mammoths released by other companies but I never felt they came close to matching this one. This all changed when CollectA released their recent model as I was taken in by its pose and sheer bulk. Once it arrived, I had to decide whether it was worthy of dethroning the old mammoth and becoming the new king of the console. The decision proved easier than I thought…

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A+ Uintatherium Model Flunks Anger Management!

Dinosaurs weren’t the only amazing beasts to have roamed North America. Take Uintatherium for example. This unusual looking mammal, reminiscent of a rhinoceros with its multiple knobby horns, lived about forty to forty-five million years ago in what is now Wyoming. In fact, Uintatherium means “Beast of the Uinta Mountains” where it was discovered. It was an impressive thirteen feet long and weighed in at around 4,000 pounds. In keeping with their proud assortment of amazing prehistoric animals, CollectA added one of these to their menagerie earlier this year.

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CollectA goes Full Frontal with Megacerops!

I just returned from visiting the Dakotas while making a few Prehistoric Pit Stops along the way. Ironically, a couple of those excursions tied in with a figure I’d just received before I left – CollectA’s Megacerops. This model is part of their Prehistoric Life Collection and, just like their Deinotherium model I reviewed in my last post, breaks the mold in terms of scientific accuracy! Whereas the previous figure depicted a relative of the modern day elephant, this two-toed ungulate was a member of the Titanothere family which shares ancestry with today’s horses, tapirs, and rhinos. It definitely looks like a rhinoceros cousin with its double horns though, unlike rhinos, these are part of the animal’s skull and “true” horns. Their unique appearance illustrates once again how diverse and amazing our planet’s prehistoric mammals truly were.

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CollectA Deinotherium – Marvelous Model for a “Terrible Beast!”

African Elephants have always been my favorite living animal and are part of a proud, diverse family that can be traced over much of the planet. These Proboscideans included some of the Earth’s largest land mammals with the subject of today’s review one of its most impressive. Deinotherium dominated Africa as well as Eurasia approximately 10 million to 10,000 years ago, possibly crossing paths with early humans. Its name means “terrible beast” and was larger than modern elephants though with a shorter trunk. Its most distinguishing characteristic, however, were its tusks that curved downward from its lower jaw. In most other members of the elephant family, tusks jut from the upper jaw and curve in the opposite direction. The reason Deinotherium’s evolved this way is still up for debate with some suggesting they were designed for digging out roots and tubers much like a backhoe. Another notable featured that differed from its more dome-headed cousins was a nearly flat skull.

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